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  3. Interesting 3+0 game

Hi, played a crazy 3+0 game yesterday against 2500+ opponent. Want to share with you. Comments are appreciated. https://en.lichess.org/study/daehaft6

Looks like a pretty typical greek gift sacrifice where there are still chances for both sides after Kg6. It's definitely harder to play the black side in these positions, especially in blitz.

I like your opening by the way. It seems like a solid position where the plan is quite simple for white. Think I might try it out.

Yeah, it is typical, but there was a better solution that looks like winning on the spot (Ng5 Nh7 Nf6 idea:)
And the opening works quite well, especially in blitz, but Black has better options than closing LSB with 3. e7-e6.

There exist several games of Edgar Colle with the same opening (Colle) and the same sacrificial theme.

@Bugcrusher Edgar Colle also won some nice games where black did not play ...e6: against Rubinstein and against Euwe. The opening is not only for blitz: Alekhine, Smyslow and Jussupow have played it on occasion.
@jposthuma Edgar Colle did not fear a black ...e5, for example a nice win against Stolz. So there is no compelling need to play b3. Also if black plays ...b6 he cannot stop white, see for example a nice win of Colle against Grünfeld.

There are two different approaches for white - one develop your pieces as I did, and other is to prepare e3-e4. In the first case, e6-e5, after preparation (not as Stoltz played), really disturbs all the White's setup and Black has no problem equalizing.

Yes I know. Edgar Colle always played c3, sort of a reverse Slav Defence. Georges Koltanowsky used to play b3, sort of a reverse Queen's Gambit Declined Tartakover variation.
As for the easy equalizing: that was also said of the London System d4, Nf3, Bf4, until Kramnik & Carlsen picked it up.