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  3. display all stockfish 23 moves in practice mode

Hi, I would love the following feature being implemented in lichess.

I love being beated by stockfish every time I play.
What I find the most useful feature is the "practice mode",
with the "get hint/view best move" feature, where stockfish
evaluates every move you play and gives you the score that he computed.

However, even with that much help, sometimes I'm still wondering why
stockfish evaluates that such a position is good or bad.

There is the "show threat" option, but it just shows the very next move,
which is helpful but often isn't enough for me to decrypt stockfish's strategy.

Since stockfish uses a "minmax" algorithm, I believe it has already anticipated the next
23 "best" moves for both players.

So my idea is: would it be possible to somehow display all those moves, as if we were in
stockfish's mind, and therefore better understand the rationale behind his sometimes cryptic moves?

In terms of implementation, I thought about one of two things:

- either a pile of screenshots on a sidebar, each screenshot being one move
- or even better, some numbered arrows directly on the chessboard


Actually I believe that just being two or three moves ahead is all I would be using
if such a feature existed, but that would be super kool, don't you think?

Especially for rook and pawns endgames, being able to see stockfish's amazing anticipating power would be both amazing and very instructive.

May this message inspire you, lichess creators/devs.

I like what TCEC and Kasparov's Gambit (1993) do, animating possible variations in the miniboard: