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English usage in America

Take my wife...Please! ...and as an old NFL football coach Bum Phillips once said...I have to take my wife with me where ever I go...cause she's to ugly to kiss goodbye.:]

@doublebanzai : are you referring to that hideous language they speak in the valley?
Also, I am not sure if I agree with what you said. I'll grant you that Boston and Brooklyn both have easily identifiable accents, but there are a number of distinct "southern" accents. Texans, for example, sound different from Tenesseeans (anybody know the not fake word?), who sound different from those from Alabama, who sound different from Virginians, etc.

Also, the West Coast totally has a distinctive accent. Y'all sound like you're trying to be Keanu Reeves in Point Break.

@chessspy1
It is not cockney rhyming slang..it is general slang.Do you know what the word Rhyme actually means?I grew up using those currency slang references,in Australia.Your reference source is a bit of a joke.

In India it is 'colour' while in USA it is 'color'

thank you @doublebanzai I will look it up.

@bunyip yes my "reference source is a bit of a joke" Am I then to assume you do not know what 'joke' means.(I can find a wiki definition if you need one).
Yes I know what rhyme means, and as you are pressing the point, I will respond.

Rhyming slang is a general term for a mode of speech often used in the markets of London, and although the term 'cockney' is more correctly used for those Londoners born within the sound of the Bow bells, their mode of speech is often adopted by other Londoners, and even on occasion by 'foreigners from oop north like myself.

However to continue.
Not all rhyming slang actually rhymes it is constantly changing with new words being introduced and being discarded like 'Alan Whicker' for 'nicker' 1GBP. and Ayrton Senna for tenner. Which do rhyme but are now regarded as dated.

Its a bit pearl harbour here this morning. (there is a nip in the air)

So you see that using the reference to the animals found on the old ruppe notes (pony, monkey) which were brought back to England with returning troops (from India and also imported to other old British Empire colonies (Australia etc) in the same or similar ways) And then used by those same Londoners makes non-rhyming slang terms a valid part of that 'language'.
I hope that clears up any misunderstanding me old lemon squeezer.

They do say that some rhyming slang originates in prison, and so one must also assume that descendants of criminals would also use some similar slang therms.

@clousems didn't mean to sound like i was lumping all the southern accents together.... but i do find southern accents about the most pronounced. but texas, arkansas, the deep south... i have a friend from virginia ---- i can't tell that he has an accent... maybe it returns when he goes back home.. it's fun trying to figure where someone is from amongst all those various areas...... for the ultra-archaic language i was referring to in gold country, ---- in california --- no, not that horrible valley speak (lol)... one of my subsequent posts describes boonville, in the wine country, as having a distinct language that is quickly dying out......

californians sound like keanu??? lol!!!

@chessspy1
You can copy/paste all you want..it still is not rhyming slang.
Your fatuous reference to descendants of criminals marks you as a buffoon.
Who are the "they",and do you actually subscribe to Lamarckian beliefs???
HAHAHA

"So you see that using the reference to the animals found on the old ruppe notes (pony, monkey) which were brought back to England with returning troops (from India and also imported to other old British Empire colonies (Australia etc) in the same or similar ways) And then used by those same Londoners makes non-rhyming slang terms a valid part of that 'language'."
You just nuked your own proposition.

@bunyip
Oh my God, the only think worse than 'nuking my own proposition' is splitting an infinitive surely.
However to go boldly where non have gone before and bearing in mind what Sir Winston Churchill rather neatly said "It is nonsense like that up with which I will not put".
I regard a rebuke from an Aussie as the highest praise, so,
I still contend that the words used by Cockneys as a part of their cant comes under the umbrella of Rhyming Slang.
As for buffoon and 'fatuous references. The sharpest knife cuts the deepest me old mukka.

Waaaaaait a second, you mean that gangsters in Guy Ritchie movies are NOT being literal? If you'll excuse me, I have to go rethink my life. And watch Revolver again.

Reconnecting