lichess.org

Quiet but deep move in the Atomic Attack

Chess variant
Quiet but deep move in the Atomic Attack 1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4!?

Quiet but deep move in the Atomic Attack

1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4

The idea is to play b3, Ba3 and then if black plays c5, dxc5 threatens mate. It is also an asset that the d4 pawn closes down the Bg7 -> Bxb2 threat in some lines.

Black realizes this and usually tries to mobilize its queenside pawns to defend against Ba3. It is very common to play b5 right away.

I recommend attacking this b5 pawn before anything else and put black a question.

Of course black could push the b-pawn claiming that once the pawn is on b4, Ba3 is not a threat any more. Then white plays Nc3. Black can prevent knight jumping to b5, by playing a6. However keep in mind that black always has the Qc7 or Qxc7 asset in the atomic attack, and if queenside threats are dismantled, white can capitalize on this threat and then the c3 knight will threaten taking on d5, so black loses an other tempo moving the ls bishop. If bxc3, then Ba3 threat is alive again.

After a6, axb5, in real life games, black often plays c5 here. This seems to threaten the white queen, and prevents taking on c7. Even the engine likes this move at first sight.

  1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4 b5 7. a4 a6 8. axb5 c5

White of course takes and plays for Ba3. Black in the meantime will throw in Nf6. Under normal circumstances it is recommended that you meet Nf6 with f3 in this setup. However here Ba3 is so imminent and dangerous that white can afford losing the queen to Ng4.

  1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4 b5 7. a4 a6 8. axb5 c5 9. dxc5 Nf6 10. b3 Ng4

Once the queen is gone, it seems that white can finally play Ba3. It is a good move, but then black having won the queen can interpose its own queen on d6 and Bg7 is now a threat.

  1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4 b5 7. a4 a6 8. axb5 c5 9. dxc5 Nf6 10. b3 Ng4 11. f4 Nxe5

White can do better than this, namely play the killer move 12. Bb5+.

12.. Nc6 is not an option because then 13. Ba3 and 13.. Qd6 fails to 14. Bxc6. So black has to take, then white can bring the a-rook into action.

  1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4 b5 7. a4 a6 8. axb5 c5 9. dxc5 Nf6 10. b3 Ng4 11. f4 Nxe5 12. Bb5+ axb5 13. Ra7

Again black has to take, then

  1. Nf3 f6 2. e3 d5 3. Ng5 fxg5 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qe5 Be6 6. d4 b5 7. a4 a6 8. axb5 c5 9. dxc5 Nf6 10. b3 Ng4 11. f4 Nxe5 12. Bb5+ axb5 13. Ra7 Rxa7 14. Ba3 Qd6 15. Bxd6

This is a technical win, white is up two pawns, position is safe, black has no counter play.

So is this d4 move winning? Well, not quite. There is defence against it, but strictly not along the lines of pushing queenside pawns. May be in a later post I will explain.

Reconnecting